Writing Exercises

Writing Exercise: Time Shift (Part 1 of 2)

Photo by Nathan Anderson on Unsplash The passage below is the first half of a short story that came to mind a few days ago. I've always been fascinated by people's stories of their own experiences with the supernatural and the reactions others have upon hearing these tales that seem to defy rational explanation. I'm not usually one… Continue reading Writing Exercise: Time Shift (Part 1 of 2)

Writing Exercises

Writing Exercise: Snowstorm

Photo by Les Anderson on Unsplash The woods rose up all around me, towers of dead trees and bare branches that grasped my clothing and hair as I ran. I took no notice of their thorns as they scratched through my sleeves and left strands of hair snagged on their limbs. It was after me, and the dread… Continue reading Writing Exercise: Snowstorm

Writing Exercises

Writing Exercise: A Pocket Watch, a Flea Market, and a Bit of Time Travel

Photo on Visual HuntTentes Can objects haunt us? I considered this question today when responding to a writing prompt. The answer I came up with turned into the beginning of a science fiction story, which you will find a little further below. The prompt comes from the Shut Up and Write group, an international writing community that is (despite the… Continue reading Writing Exercise: A Pocket Watch, a Flea Market, and a Bit of Time Travel

Writing Exercises

Writing Exercise: Inside the Castle (Writing Inspiration from a Dream)

Photo by Marc Marchal on Unsplash The search for story ideas is a constant in most writers' lives, and every once in a while, the ideas are the ones that search us out. Night before last, I had an odd dream that felt so realistic and detailed I decided to write a short passage about it after waking… Continue reading Writing Exercise: Inside the Castle (Writing Inspiration from a Dream)

Writing Exercises

Writing Exercise: Mirrors

Photo by Jon Eric Marababol on Unsplash Prompt "In her New York Times essay “The Ghost Story Persists in American Literature. Why?,” Parul Sehgal writes about how ghost stories throughout American literature have functioned as social critique, manifestations of protest and redress that reveal “cultural fears and fantasies,” and which understand “how strenuously we run from the past, but always… Continue reading Writing Exercise: Mirrors